Kingsman: The Secret Service

The Kingsman movie, based on the comic series by the same name, has more than earned it’s R rating. The movie is extremely violent, involving many gory deaths ranging from being sliced in half, to head explosions, all of which is onscreen. The opening involves a very violent fight scene, followed by the earlier mentioned scene of a man getting sliced in half with a very distinct and gut-wrenching sound. A man has his head blown up, which later escalates into an entire montage of various people dying in such a way to classical music. The plot of the movie, without revealing too much, involves a ‘rage-virus’ of sorts through technology, that causes people to fall into a frothing rage, and indiscriminately attack anyone and everyone close by. The first time this happens, it’s inside a church which, though it’s filled with religious bigots, is still alarming in it’s gore and can be very overwhelming. The second time this happens, a mother tries to rip her way through a bathroom door to murder her infant child. Alongside all the carnage that’s already happening in the film, it can be a little much for people who have trouble with violence. The movie is extremely violent, and seems to take great relish in their well-earned R rating. I don’t recommend this movie, unless you’re prepared for the level of violence that’s to be expected. But, if you are, it can be genuinely enjoyable for the viewer, with a lot of clever jokes and downright enjoyable characters.

Power Rangers (2017)

As would be expected of a movie based on a show about people running around in spandex, the 2017 reboot of the Power Rangers series is pretty painless for people with anxiety. Most of the movie is pretty much nonviolent, with a few moments here and there that may catch the attention of concerned parents and anxious viewers. For example, the update of Rita Repulsa is distinctly more aggressive in this version. While it isn’t actually visible onscreen, there is a scene where she rips open a hobo’s mouth to get to the gold inside his mouth. It’s only shown in shadow, but the noises and graphic thoughts that would likely accompany it would be concerning to many. She also attacks a jewelry store, destroying the place in a very alarming and concerning way. Not to mention, a nightmare scene occurs that would definitely scare a younger child. Finally, the climax could be extremely scary to those who feel anxiety about crowd scenes. It’s a lot of carnage all happening at once. While the action is meant to be funny, it can be stressful trying to focus on everything that’s happening all at once. Overall, the Power Rangers movie takes a few more chances than what would be expected with a series like this, and there are quite a few moments that would cause alarm, but I overall feel it’s worth a view to see the new take on an old classic.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl

As what is to be expected of a Disney movie, even one covering something as historically bloody as piracy, is relatively safe for younger viewers, and those suffering from anxiety. The deaths in this film are generally not gory, but there is quite a bit of blood and creepy imagery. The villainous pirates of the film suffer from a curse that makes them appear as rotted zombies. It’s not as bad as it could be, considering the fact that they use early 2000s cgi instead of makeup, which would have been more jarring. However, it should be noted that the skeletal images could probably still scare younger viewers, or those who are not expecting it. The theme of the movie revolves around blood, and, as such, there are a few scenes where blood is present, but it’s not shown with excessive gore. Most of the skeleton characters who suffer from violence recover as cartoon characters would, simply by falling apart, or by cartoonishly losing their limbs. Overall, for a film about some of the bloodier members of history, Disney chose to take it in a very safe direction. Provided you’re expecting it, it could be a very enjoyable viewing experience.

Green Lantern (2011)

Green Lantern is an attempt by DC to be more like Marvel’s formula of films. This means that, for a DC film, it tries to be more humorous than other DC movies would usually be. However, there are several parts of this film I wouldn’t recommend to anyone. For one thing, the character of Hector Hammond is incredibly creepy for younger children. Throughout the movie, his head swells in a disgusting mass, and he slowly loses his sanity. I remember being in the movie theater, and hearing several children crying because of how unsettling the character was. As for deaths, a man is burned to death onscreen following a very distressing scene featuring Hector Hammond, following several men being impaled with glass, and a doctor being stabbed in the eye with a syringe. Also, the main cause of death in this movie appears to be a form of essence-draining that leaves the corpse drained and skeletal, as if they’ve been dead for centuries. This happens to a massive crowd of people at the climax. If the viewer is easily overwhelmed by violent crowd scenes, it can be very difficult to watch. As for blood, there’s very little actual bleeding in this film, and the blood that is shown is alien blood, and may not be as concerning for some viewers.

Catwoman

Catwoman, in spite of the fact that it’s supposedly based on a DC comic book character, and it’s pg-13 rating, is about as bloodless as a comic book movie could get. There is absolutely no gory violence in the movie, and the deaths are either offscreen, or shown with very little attention and fanfare. Two of the four character deaths involve simple gunshot wounds and scratch-marks, one involves drowning, and the fourth involves a very unrealistic look at falling off a great height. In fact, the main villain’s ability is that her skin can’t be cut, which would suggest a lack of blood or gore for her character. The death scene involving falling off a building is as most movies do it, with the character’s body just dropping and going still, and is barely reflected on. In the beginning of the movie, a brief moment where a woman supposedly with severe burn scars appears, but the CG isn’t quite good enough to make it look as disturbingly realistic as it was probably supposed to be. There are a few mentions of satanism in the opening credits, and quickly flashed by during a web search, but these have absolutely nothing to do with the plot, and are only there to show the impact of cats throughout history. I would wonder exactly how a comic book film like this got a PG-13 rating with absolutely no violence, but something tells me that Catwoman’s outfit may have had something to do with it. Overall, Catwoman is very safe to watch for anyone with anxieties, but I honestly can’t recommend it as a good movie.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2014

TMNT 2014 is surprisingly easy to view, in spite of the childhood-scarring cgi that makes up most of it. Now, while I can pick on the cgi for the turtles all I want, that’s not what I’m here for. But, in all respects, TMNT is very easy to watch for when it comes to most anxiety triggers. The violence that does happen onscreen is almost entirely happening to cgi creatures, which are very easy to distinguish from the human characters. While there are one or two scenes that involve humans not covered by outrageously pointy armor being injured. During a scene where the Shredder is training, he snaps the hand of someone fighting against him, and does beat the crap out of him, but still in a way that seems very PG-13, as the movie is rated. A later scene involves a random mook being poisoned by mutagen. The mook’s skin then proceeds to be melted off his body as he dies, in a way that makes me wonder how on Earth that managed to be included in a Nickelodeon movie. The scene would probably scare a young child considerably, as well as anyone with anxieties about gore. As far as the rest of the movie, there’s a lot of blood that gets medically drained out of the bodies of the turtles, but the rest is mostly bloodless and without needless gore. However, I do recommend skipping past the gas-testing scene if you have a young child, or get queasy by that kind of thing.

Paranormal Activity 2

Paranormal activity 2, much like in the vein of the original film, is very big on what isn’t shown onscreen to supply the scares. Most of the film, as is par for the course in this series, is dedicated only to moving objects subtly on camera to create a feeling of general unease for the audience. However, about halfway through the movie, the family dog is affected by the supernatural events going on in the house, and it’s never confirmed as to whether or not the animal lives. From what I remember of the film, the animal is not shown being harmed in any way onscreen, so any concerns you may have as to something like that can easily be avoided. Throughout the movie, an infant is constantly endangered, and stalked by danger. Also, the end is dedicated mostly to jumpscares, which can be extremely anxiety-inducing, especially if you are caught off guard. Finally, the end involves two characters being killed onscreen, both in very shocking and unsettling ways. When I was watching it, I was caught off-guard due to how the rest of this movie has been relatively painless and bloodless. However, the one of the last two deaths involve quite a bit of blood, and may leave the viewer feeling very anxious.